Block 2 Topic

We have now moved onto Block Two of my Advertising and Branding module which involves studying a particular type of advertising.

I decided to investigate car advertising because they have a a certain style to them, which we are all just so used to now. However, I wonder if they were always like this and if not (which i suspect they were not) how and why they changed. So I basically want to analyse car advertising and look at how it has changed over the years. I would like to compare the way different brands advertise their cars. I would also like to see whether the way they are advertised reflects the way we think about cars or did they change the way we think about them. So here is my question:

“How did cars go from being tools to being therapy”?

This is a quote from Do Good Design by David B. Berman (2009) where he is critiquing a poster for Mazda. The poster shows a shot of the car from the font with one single line of copy that says: ‘insects call it “the windowmaker”.’


This poster is trying to give the impression that insects are in awe of the car. When you actually think about it this awe is more in the dread or fear sense of the word – rather than any kind of wonderment. That car will kill them and rather than hiding the fact, Mazda have glorified it. Berman comments in his critique that we are ‘making 73 species extinct every day’ and that we should show more respect for the living creatures that struggle to survive alongside us. Instead, this poster copy conveys the idea of the car having power over these insects so gives you a confidence boost because you can master weaker things.

I want to find out why modern car advertising is like this.

 

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